Tag Archives: kokopelli packrafts

Product Review: Rugged New 13lb Kokopelli XPD Inflatable Packraft

We recently posted our Sneak Preview on the new XPD inflatable packraft from Kokopelli Packraft – one of the exciting new models we’ve seen for 2020. What’s so special? While the XPD packraft is based on the Kokopelli Rogue-Lite profile, the XPD features a more beefed-up PVC construction for rigorous use on flat water and lakes through Class II.

Last week, the 2020 models started rolling in, so we begin our 2020 Kokopelli reviews with the 13.6 lbs XPD, which can be inflated to higher pressures of 2.75 PSI.
Getting Started with the Kokopelli XPD
We unpacked the box and laid out the pieces – inflatable packraft body (13.7 lbs), inflatable seat base (8 ozs), repair kit (4.1 ozs), Nano dual action hand pump with gauge (2 lbs), instructions and two 2 cinch belts( 1.6 oz each).

Boxed up, the dimensions are 29 x 20 x 8 inches with a shipping weight of just under 20 lbs. The packraft folded is roughly 24 x 20 x 8 inches, rolled it is roughly 25 x 8.5 inches.
The generic instructions for Kokopellli’s PVC series include inflation and deflation techniques, seat and backband installation (not found on the XPD but used in the Recon) but lack details on actual set up; we will outline the steps we took, below. In general, set up is straight-forward – unpack, unfold, inflate.

The first step is to unfold the packraft – it is remarkably flat – and orient yourself; the rear/stern is wider and has the inflation valve.

The Kokopelli XPD utilizes one main GRI push-push valve for inflation. These are very simple to use and feature an inflate mode (spring plunger is UP) and a deflate mode (spring plunger is DOWN). By using your finger to gently push on the plunger, it can be moved to the inflate mode (air goes in and doesn’t come back out) and deflate mode (air goes in and comes back out). Before you go to all the effort of inflating the board, PLEASE make sure the plunger is in the inflate position.

Next, set up the pump – this is not mentioned in the instructions. Unlike most of the packrafts – which use inflator bags – the XPD comes with a very nifty, collapsible, dual-action Nano pump and built-in pressure gauge. Fold down the feet and attach the hose to the side that says Inflate. There are two pieces of plastic tubes in the plastic packaging – these are screw on handles. Unfortunately, there is no place to attach/store the handles when removed so you may want to purchase a mesh laundry bag to keep them together. Or, don’t even bother attaching the handles as the pump is pretty easy to use without them.

The Nano pump

Original Source: AirKayaks >>

2020 Comparison Table Guide to Selecting an Inflatable Kayak at AirKayaks

As the weather heats up in the Northern Hemisphere, thoughts turn to outdoor activities and “fun-in-the-sun.” If you’ve arrived at this blog article, you’re already intrigued with the idea of paddling across a lake, down a lazy river or along a coastline, and are looking into inflatable kayaks. Maybe you have limited space, want to pack into the back country, need lighter weight options or travel in an RV.  Regardless of the motivation, there are a myriad of choices which can be daunting.

To help you narrow down the field, AirKayaks has put together a table comparing our 2020 inflatable kayak options – the table is located at the bottom of this article. The kayaks have been divided into four sections sorted by price – Under $500; $500 to $749; $750 to $999; and $1000 and up.  Within each of those four sections, we have sorted by manufacturer, model name and stock number, price range, number of paddlers, kayak lengths, widths, weights, payloads, # of chambers, inflation pressures, design style and kayak type.
AirKayaks originally posted this article in 2019. We have updated it to reflect the kayak choices and changes for 2020. To help you get going, we describe the attributes of each style first. For further information on inflatable kayak choices, benefits and definitions, please also see our popular guide to Choosing an Inflatable Kayak – What You Should Consider.
Enclosed Design Inflatable Kayaks

The enclosed hull design is similar to many hard shell kayaks; this is shown above in the Advanced Elements AE1044 AdvancedFrame DS-XL kayak.  The snugger cockpit design keeps excess water and wind from entering the kayak, and also less direct sun. Many of them have coamings (the gray tube in the photo above, encircling the cockpit) that allow you to attach a spray skirt.
 

What is a spray skirt? This is an accessory that attaches to the kayak around the coaming, and then again to your body (shown above on an Innova Swing). The function is to keep out even more wind and water.

Many of the enclosed decks can be zipped open for easy entry or to cool off, but the benefits of the enclosed design include the ability to kayak in windier and colder climates/situations (shown above, the Aquaglide Navarro series).

A closed-design tandem can also be paddled solo, but it is not as balanced as the paddler must sit in the rear fixed cockpit, rather than the optimal position “just rear of center.” Typically, adding weight to the front will help balance out the kayak (as shown with Eddie sitting in the front cockpit of an Innova Swing 2 kayak).
Open Design Inflatable Kayaks:

This includes the largest number of kayaks. The open design consists of a kayak with higher

Original Source: AirKayaks >>

Rugged New Kokopelli XPD Inflatable Packraft

One of the exciting new models we’ve seen for 2020 is Kokopelli Packraft’s rugged XPD Packraft, featuring a beefed up hull which can be inflated to higher pressures of 2 to 3 PSI.

This week, Kokopelli launched a Kickstarter Campaign to boost awareness of the XPD, which is expected to arrive later this spring.

What’s so special? While the XPD packraft is based on the Kokopelli Rogue-Lite profile, the XPD features a more beefed-up construction for rigorous use on flat water and lakes through Class II. The hull is constructed from a reinforced 0.9mm (1000 denier) PVC, yet still packs down to the size of a large sleeping bag, roughly 22 x 12 x 8 inches in size. The XPD sports GRI push-push military valves, rather than the Leafield D4 valves found on the previous packrafts. Dimensions are the same as the popular Rogue Lite at 85 by 37 inches, but weighs in at 13 lbs with a payload of 300 lbs.
We were able to see an initial model last fall, when Kokopelli’s Sales Manager – Andrew Duran – flew a prototype out to California for us to test out.

Our first take on the XPD? It fills a niche for recreational flatwater paddling that is portable and fun. It’s rugged, very simple to set up, easy to get into, lightweight and zippy. As someone once said, “It turns on a dime and gives you back change.”
The open design is perfect for those who have physical disabilities or dislike being enclosed. It is easily paddled by large and small (my 6’2″ husband in the XPD above) older and younger, and it’s rugged enought to hand over to the kids or to take a furry companion.

And it’s just heavy enough to seat itself in the water, yet – at 13 lbs – light enough to toss around. Check out the following video:
 

The XPD will be available in two colors – red and green – both with and without tizip. MSRP is $749 and $899 respectively.
See the Kokopelli Packraft XPD Kickstarter Campaign, and also check out our wordpress blog on the Kokopelli Packraft 2020 Product Line.

We also have a limited amount of past season 2019 Kokopelli Packraft models at 15% off, with prices as low as $699 with a free paddle.
The XPDs are expected to be available at AirKayaks.com in late spring. Need more info? Feel free to Contact Us or give us a call at 707-998-0135.

Original Source: AirKayaks >>

2019 Comparison Table Guide to Selecting an Inflatable Kayak at AirKayaks

As the weather heats up in the Northern Hemisphere, thoughts turn to outdoor activities and “fun-in-the-sun.” If you’ve arrived at this blog article, you’re already intrigued with the idea of paddling across a lake, down a lazy river or along a coastline, and are looking into inflatable kayaks. Maybe you have limited space, want to pack into the back country, need lighter weight options or travel in an RV.  Regardless of the motivation, there are a myriad of choices which can be daunting.

To help you narrow down the field, AirKayaks has put together a table comparing our inflatable kayak options – the table is located at the bottom of this article. We have listed the following details – manufacturer, model name and stock number, price range, number of paddlers, kayak lengths, widths, weights, payloads, # of chambers, inflation pressures, design style and kayak type.

We have divided our inflatable kayak list into four sections sorted by price – Under $500; $500 to $749; $750 to $999; and $1000 and up.  Within each of those four sections, we have sorted by number of paddlers – 1 paddler; 1-2 paddlers (seats can be repositioned), 2 paddlers; and 2+( extra room for gear, child or dog). This is followed by body style enclosed, open and sit-on-top. To help you get going, we describe the attributes of each style first. For further information on inflatable kayak choices, benefits and definitions, please also see our popular guide to Choosing an Inflatable Kayak – What You Should Consider.
Enclosed Design Inflatable Kayaks

The enclosed hull design is similar to many hard shell kayaks; this is shown above in the Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame DS-XL kayak.  The snugger cockpit design keeps excess water and wind from entering the kayak, and also less direct sun. Many of them have coamings (the gray tube in the photo above, encircling the cockpit) that allow you to attach a spray skirt.
 

What is a spray skirt? This is an accessory that attaches to the kayak around the coaming, and then again to your body (shown above on an Innova Swing). The function is to keep out even more wind and water.

Many of the enclosed decks can be zipped open for easy entry or to cool off, but the benefits of the enclosed design include the ability to kayak in windier and colder climates/situations (shown above, the Advanced Elements AirFusion EVO).

A closed-design tandem can also be paddled solo, but it is not as balanced as the paddler must sit in the rear fixed cockpit, rather than the optimal position “just rear of center.” Typically, adding weight to the front will help balance out the kayak (as shown with Eddie sitting in the front cockpit of an Innova

Original Source: AirKayaks >>

2019 Kokopelli Inflatable Packraft Product Line – What’s New

We recently received news on the new 2019 Kokopelli lineup of inflatable packrafts and gear.

For those unfamiliar with the term, “packrafts” are loosely defined as an inflatable raft weighing under 10 lbs, that can easily be packed/rolled up, making them a great choice for accessing remote locations. While the sport originated in Alaska, the popularity is rapidly expanding globally.
Photo by Colin Arisman
Kokopelli Outdoor Inc. of Denver, Colorado entered the packraft market in 2014, beginning with a handful of models. Last year’s Kokopelli line-up consisted of four whitewater models – the Nirvana and Nirvana XL in self-bailing and spray deck versions; three touring series – the Castaway, Castaway XL and the Twain Tandem; and two ultra-packable models – Rogue and Rogue Lite.
For 2019, Kokopelli continues to streamline and upgrade the product line, adding one new model and some new accessories. The packrafts have been regrouped into three categories – Whitewater, Lake and Adventure.

The 2019 Whitewater series now consists of two current models – the Nirvana Spraydeck (above) and the Nirvana Self Bailer – each with tizip options. While there has been no change to the dimensional specifications or weights, the Nirvana Self Bailer is the only packraft with an inflatable floor (elevating the paddler above any water) with integrated seat base and separate backband. Prices remain the same at $1050 for the base models, and $1200 for packrafts with the tizip option.

The third Whitewater model is new for 2019 – the Recon. Weighing in at a beefy 18 lbs, the Recon features a robust 9mm PVC construction with self-bailing design for intense whitewater or rugged conditions. The Recon sports a 90 x 37 inch exterior, a 57 x 15″ interior with 9mm nylon ripstop floor, and is available in Arctic blue without tizip options. MSRP $900 which includes a bellows foot pump with integrated pressure gauge, but not an inflator bag.

The 2019 Adventure series consists of two models – Rogue (above) and Rogue-Lite. While similar in size and dimensions to the Nirvana, the Rogue with spray-deck features a thinner 210 denier hull material with beefed-up Kevlar reinforcement. The thinner denier material packs down smaller and weighs roughly 2 lbs less, making it more desirable for longer distances, while the Kevlar construction makes it nearly as durable as the Nirvana. The Rogue-Lite features an open cockpit and slightly shorter length, weighing in at a mere 5.4 lbs. Both Rogues are available with or without tizip. MSRP is $825 for the Rogue-Lite and $1050 for the Rogue. Tizip options on both Rogues are an additional $125.
Both the Rogues and Nirvana’s now sport an improved material with thicker TPU coating for added durability and abrasion resistance which also adds a slight 0.2 lbs to

Original Source: AirKayaks >>

New 2018 Kokopelli Inflatable Packraft Product Line

We recently received news on the new 2018 Kokopelli lineup of inflatable packrafts.

For those unfamiliar with the term, “packrafts” are loosely defined as a an inflatable raft weighing under 10 lbs, that can easily be packed/rolled up, making them a great choice for accessing remote locations. While the sport originated in Alaska, the popularity is rapidly expanding globally.
Last year’s Kokopelli line-up consisted of four whitewater models – the Nirvana and Nirvana XL in self-bailing and spray deck versions – joined by three touring series: the Castaway, Castaway XL and a two-person version named the Twain. The two longer touring series models featured packrafts with removable tracking fins, making them better suited for calm water paddling. Also in 2017, the packrafts were reengineered with upgraded Leafield D7 military valves, replacing the original Boston valves. The D7 valve seal was designed to be self-cleaning, reducing leakage risks due to dirt contamination.

For 2018, Kokopelli adds two new models and continues to streamline, re-organize and upgrade the product line – which also resulted in price increases.
A new bottom hull construction makes the packrafts more rigid. By repositioning where the hull bottom attaches to the side chambers, the paddler sits a bit higher, and doesn’t sag down in the boat. This in turn improves the backband support (it is now positioned lower on the back), as well as making it easier to paddle over the side chambers. Together, the improvements eliminated the need for an inflatable floor, saving on weight.
The packraft sterns were redesigned with 30% more volume, providing greater buoyancy and a slightly lower waterline, eliminating water pooling issues as well as allowing more gear to be stored in the tizip versions.
All backbands and inflatable seats feature a beefed up construction with an easier attachment system.
Last season’s new French Gray color (more of a desaturated Army gray-green for those seeking less visiblity) returns for 2018. The color has been expanded to the Twain series.
The 2018 Whitewater series now consists of two models – the Nirvana Spraydeck and the Nirvana Self Bailer – each with tizip options. While there has been no change to the dimensional specifications or weights, the Nirvana Self Bailer is the only packraft with an inflatable floor (elevating the paddler above any water) which now boasts an integrated seat base and separate backband.
The Nirvana XL self-bailing whitewater series has been eliminated as the longer packrafts tend to wrap on rocks and get caught in holes. Instead, the Nirvana XL deck-version has been moved into the touring series as the Castaway XL with spray deck.

The Touring series – consisting of the Castaway, Castaway XL and Twain 2 – remain virtually unchanged as open models, except for the addition of the Castaway XL

Original Source: AirKayaks >>

New Ultralite 13.6 lb Twain Inflatable Tandem Kayak from Kokopelli Raft Co.

Last July, AirKayaks had the opportunity to test out a prototype version of Kokopelli Raft Company’s new Twain – an inflatable kayak/packraft for one or two paddlers, weighing in at a mere 13.6 lbs.

For those unfamiliar with the term, “packrafts” are loosely defined as a an inflatable raft weighing under 10 lbs, that can easily be packed/rolled up, making them a great choice for accessing remote locations. While the sport originated in Alaska, the popularity is rapidly expanding globally.

Three years ago, Kokopelli entered the steadily-growing packraft market, introducing the Hornet and Renegade whitewater and flatwater rafts and winning Gear Junkies “Best In Show Top Gear for 2016” at last summer’s Outdoor Retailer.

For 2016, the Kokopelli line-up consists of four whitewater models – the 91″ Nirvana and 104″ Nirvana XL – in self-bailing or integrated spray deck versions weighing in at 8.4 to 10.2 lbs. These are joined by the new touring series featuring the 91″ Castaway and 104″ Castaway XL solo models and the new 122″ Twain two-person version. Weights range from 7.3 to 13.8 lbs, with the Castaway XL and Twain sporting removable tracking fins and removable floors. All models come with an inflation “bag” weighing a mere 4 ounces, as well as an inflatable seat, though they also can be pumped up using a traditional hand or foot pump. Each of the models also includes a TiZip variation, which offers internal storage in the main tubes. Prices range from $875 to $999 dependent upon the model and options.

We were duly impressed with the prototype Twain – it was lightweight, easy to assemble and featured two inflation chambers for added safety. The kayak was easily paddled by one – making it a great choice for those with lots of gear. While some of the ultra-lightweight and shorter kayaks can bob around, the longer silhouette and added tracking fin allows the the Twain to be better seated in the water, and paddle straighter. The addition of an inflatable 4-inch 840 denier floor with side wells provides extra buoyancy and rigidity, allowing the paddler(s) to sit higher, keeping out of the water, yet could be removed for those interested in conserving weight. The open design also offers easy entry and exit as well as a higher paddling position to allow deeper and more efficient paddle strokes.

Eleven-inch diameter tubes constructed from a 210 denier, double-coated nylon, ensure stability on the water as well as providing some protection from swells. One-inch seam welds with reinforced tape ensure durability and the highest-quality, air-holding properties, capable of holding 650 lbs.

The new Kokopelli inflatable rafts are in transit, expected to be here approximately May 10th; Kokopelli completely sold out of their first production run earlier this year, with

Original Source: AirKayaks >>

Comparison Table Guide to Selecting an Inflatable Kayak at AirKayaks

As the weather heats up in the Northern Hemisphere, thoughts turn to outdoor activities and “fun-in-the-sun.” If you’ve arrived at this blog article, you’re already intrigued with the idea of paddling across a lake, down a lazy river or along a coastline, and are looking into inflatable kayaks. Maybe you have limited space, want to pack into the back country, need lighter weight options or travel in an RV.  Regardless of the motivation, there are a myriad of choices which can be daunting.

To help you narrow down the field, AirKayaks has put together a table comparing our inflatable kayak options. We have listed the following details – manufacturer, model name and stock number, price range, number of paddlers, kayak lengths, widths, weights, payloads, # of chambers, inflation pressures, design style and kayak type.
We have divided our inflatable kayak list into three sections sorted by kayak style – enclosed, open and sit-on-top – and within that, by length. To help you get going, we describe the attributes of each style first. For further information on inflatable kayak choices, benefits and definitions, please also see our popular guide to Choosing an Inflatable Kayak – What You Should Consider.
Enclosed Design Inflatable Kayaks

The enclosed hull design is similar to many hard shell kayaks; this is shown above in the Advanced Elements AdvancedFrame DS-XL kayak.  The snugger cockpit design keeps excess water and wind from entering the kayak, and also less direct sun. Many of them have coamings (the gray tube in the photo above, encircling the cockpit) that allow you to attach a spray skirt.
 

What is a spray skirt? This is an accessory that attaches to the kayak around the coaming, and then again to your body (shown above on an Innova Swing). The function is to keep out even more wind and water.

Many of the enclosed decks can be zipped open for easy entry or to cool off, but the benefits of the enclosed design include the ability to kayak in windier and colder climates/situations (shown above, the Advanced Elements AirFusion Elite).

A closed-design tandem can also be paddled solo, but it is not as balanced as the paddler must sit in the rear fixed cockpit, rather than the optimal position “just rear of center.” Typically, adding weight to the front will help balance out the kayak (as shown with Eddie sitting in the front cockpit of an Innova Swing 2 inflatable kayak).
Open Design Inflatable Kayaks:

This includes the largest number of kayaks. The open design consists of a kayak with higher walls – which keeps out some water – but a much more open design (shown above on the AquaGlide Chelan Tandem XL for 1-3 paddlers). The benefits include the ability to adjust the

Original Source: AirKayaks >>